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times" about growing up with their single moms in mississippi and making the tough choice to go off to harvard and yale. yes, for them it was a very different choice than it is for most students. it wasn't an easy thing to do. you'll hear their stories coming up. go anywhere in the world, but you had to leave right now, would you go? man: 'oh i can't go tonight' woman: 'i can't.' hero : that's what expedia asked me. host: book the flight but you have to go right now. hero: (laughs) and i just go? this is for real right? this is for real? i always said one day i'd go to china, just never thought it'd be today. anncr: we're giving away a trip every day. download the expedia app and your next trip could be on us. expedia, find yours. from capital one... boris earns unlimited rewards for his small business. can i get the smith contract, please? thank you. that's three new paper shredders. [ boris ] put 'em on my spark card. [ garth ] boris' small business earns 2% cash back on every purchase every day. great businesses deserve unlimited rewards. read back the chicken's testimony, please
carolina, north carolina, texas, mississippi, colorado. i don't know, pretty red states. unfriendliest, new jersey, california, michigan. >> liberal, liberal. >> go to mississippi for vacation. >> oakland is a beautiful city that is rotten. it is rotten because of liberal policy. >> i want to agree with my colleague here from wherever he is from. you are right. if you look at just the crime rates i would bet you the crime rates up against you would find a direct correlation. >> and economic freedom. if you look at a person's ability to start a business and sustain. if you go to places like in the top ten you will have that opportunity plus i think the weather is great in sonoma, california. >> the weather is great in oakland. >> it is because it is unfriendly. >> right to work states. no taxation. >> that's what they stop and think about because they are happier. they don't pay taxes. they don't have to pay union dues. >> can you blame detroit for being unfriendly? >> i wouldn't want there to be a city. >> i wouldn't want to live there. also, albany has the state government of new york. so
picky about where it breeds. >> all 100 of those frogs are here, in mississippi. >> it was only one breeding pond known to exist, which was in harrison county, mississippi, and it had not been seen in louisiana since 1967. people kind of laughed, that frog is way over in mississippi, they've seen him, how did he swim across three rivers, cross three interstates and end up over here. >> the designated land in louisiana is privately owned and has been in one family for generations. >> it's land that my family has owned for well over 100 jeers, it's an actively managed tree farm. my great grandfather started a lumber company after the civil war. he built a lumber railroad in these areas in order to bring the timber down. we are standing right now in the middle of an area of about 1500 acres the fish and wildlife service has certified is a critical habitat for frogs that have not been here for many, many years, the frogs need certain elements to live. one of them is a pond. the fish and wildlife service says this is one of these ponds. now it renders his land worthless to potential deve
rather have a brand new state of the art pipeline traveling down the margin mississippi and on the trunk to be cut tanker cars and trucks. >> host: there was a story that was reported by the newspaper saying that the decision would likely be until the inspector general looked at the investigation of the conflict of interest complete and the inspector general looked at the complete of the environmental research mismanagement that prepares the environmental impact statement on the keystone xl on the central conflict. >> guest: it's not a new story. that came out and was thoroughly investigated. my understanding is that there were no conflicts found. what you are starting to see frankly is the recycling of a lot of defense. keep in mind, that executive order that was put in place that governs this entire process was put in place to expedite the cross border transportation facilities. instead of expediting it, this environment environmental impact we could have built the empire state building five times buy now. we have completed world war ii in less time. so again as an institutional list a
. because of that there are still flash flood warnings and regular warnings up and down the mississippi river because of the potential for more flooding. also the threat of severe storms from southeastern montana into parts of kansas where we could end up with large hail and damaging winds. a few tornadoes are possible but they should be brief. this is most likely later this afternoon and into this evening. the plains really do not need anymore rain right now. >> absolutely. it could be a busy weather day. >>> straight ahead, the fbi let informants commit over 5600 crimes. powerball is over $400 million. >>> a frightening report of what dirty car sellers are doing that only a trusted mechanic can save you from. "first look" is back in three. right now, 7 years of music is being streamed. a quarter million tweeters are tweeting. and 900 million dollars are changing hands online. that's why hp built a new kind of server. one that's 80% smaller. uses 89% less energy. and costs 77% less. it's called hp moonshot. and it's giving the internet the room it needs to grow. this&is gonna be big. h
who don't know who emmett till is. a 14-year-old black kid in mississippi, 1955 and flirted with a white woman and a few days later two white racists attacked him and shot him to death. now this is who she is comparing this to, trayvon martin. i feel like oprah diminished her brand here. it was a big missed opportunity for oprah winfrey. i was expecting her to take the high road and elevate the conversation and to bring the country forward and add a little unity here. instead she made this atrocious analogy and i am a little disappointed in oprah. >> that was an awesome chandelier. banned phrase. decimate. did we discuss this in the a block? i must have got 150 tweets telling me exactly what decimate means and that the president was using it incorrectly. i disagree. he was using it correctly. to decimate is to kill every 10th man. so technically 90% of al-qaeda is still in operation. president obama is saying, yes, we have 10% and we have 90% left. that's all i want to do. >> technically that's what he meant. so stop using decimate. >> if we stop using the words you tell us
in the mississippi river. the missouri supreme court will now decide his fate. walmart has agreed to approve -- improve safety conditions as part of a settlement with federal health and safety regulators. federal inspectors have uncovered what they termed repeat and serious violations at a store in rochester, new york. under the deal, walmart will improve procedures relating to trash compactors and the handling of chemicals and hire an outside monitor to ensure compliance at store locations in 28 states. walmart will also pay $190,000, tiny fraction of its profits which amounted to 17 billion dollars last year. in a statement, the worker group our walmart, which has lisa only -- which has recently led a number of historic strikes, said last month workers at a california warehouse that moose products for walmart launched a two-day strike to protest alleged retaliation after reporting safety issues that included blocked emergency exits, nonfunctioning forklift brakes and a lack of sufficient ventilation, and water under intense heat. japan's prime minister has ordered government action to help
to leave mississippi in the 1960s to get married. how do you think it affected you the idea that your parent's marriage was a crime? >> well, i think that it created in me a sense of psychological exile. >> and when she was 19, her mother was murdered by her former stepfather. >> i tried to make sense of that loss. >> here the dead stand up in stone. i stand on ground once hollowed by -- >> she won a pulitzer prize in 2007. about a forgotten union regiment that fought in the civil war. >> we know that it is our duty now to keep white men as would be masters. >> she wrote that poem and would look up at a pillar marked poetry. >> and now that i do it i can't see it so clearly but i have faith that it is there. >> so she will continue to cheer lead in a world that doesn't always value that. >> trying to find a way to say what seems so necessary to be said but so difficult also to someone that i can speak intimately to. across time and space on the page that is thrilling to me. >> this summer the library of congress appointed her to a second term. but her time in washington is coming to a
to be a person that is helping the cause and not coming against it. >> you grew up in mississippi? >> i did. kelly, i am two generations short from maids and farmers. it's because of my father, the late reverend james thomas mcclowen, that my mother got to go to high school. he built the first black high school in mississippi, my town. we have a long way to go. my father worked heavily to help integrate schools in mississippi. but today we don't have a level playing field when it comes to education. today the new plantation is the prison system. we have more black males in the prison system. so with the hard work that my father did and by the way, he was assistant warden also in the prison where before my father got there, there were chain gangs. my father really believed that you could rehabilitate the criminal. so we have a long way to go with the inner city, with people now on welfare, more so than ever before. so we have equal opportunity. do we have equal access? >> jack gains, thank you. joe freeman, good friends of mine. thank you both. juan williams, always good to have you. angela,
can't get fresh salmon. >> mississippi number two, alabama number three. >> bad accents. >> we're the craziest state. >> california tops the list. >> craziest state and you adopt even mention florida? come on. that doesn't make sense at all. >> i've lived in florida and florida has all the of the weirdest news stories. don't certain websites have pages just devoted to florida weird news. >> u.s. news, foreign news, sports, florida. >> colorado also has a lot of weird news. >> fun to talk about. everyone has their own opinion. >>> a sad scene, hundreds of dolphins mysteriously dying along the east coast. why is this happening and what does it have to do with humans? >> and is today the day the -- >> boy band. >> i shouldn't read this. what do i know. it's 'n sync, are they getting together? brand-new evidence your favorite boy band and needless to say mine is making a comeback. >> nervous, tucker is reading this one. he does have all their albums. we're new to town.ells. welcome to monroe. so you can move more effortlessly... we want to open a new account: checking and savings.
was cultivated. mississippi was always a scary --ace because emmett till was because emmett till was murdered there. and yet, when i go south i still remember that i am black, and i wonder if people will see anything, and all they ever say is, "y'all come back, you hear," or "we wish you were president, bill." it always stuns me. i'm gun shy because of how i was brought up. but we had a wonderful time in west virginia. host: michael in alabama is calling on our republican line. caller: yeah, hello, i would like to say about race, you know, every time a black person kills a white person, it's ok, but if a white person kills a black person, they set out to do it as a race thing. it's not a race thing all the time. we are past all that now. we need to learn to love each other and accept people for who they are in good complaining -- -- quit and planning. guest: who was complaining? caller: well, i mean, the blacks always complain -- guest: why don't you think we are explaining our circumstances? caller: well, they just complain you know, get over what happened in the past. guest: you are from th
violence escalating, the ku klux klan skyrockets, you have the mississippi codes, which began in 1877 and were crystallized in 1901. it deprived blacks of being able to own property. restricts voting rights. for example, in mississippi. and i think in 1871, 97% of african-american men can vote in the state of mississippi. when hayes ends reconstruction, 10 years later, less than 1.5% of african-american men can vote. the violence, the intimidation, the grandfather's clause, the poll tax. it is really two separate nations where african-americans emboldened by frederick douglass in the north began to really organize and begin to secure the rights while the south have theirs stripped away. >> mike is watching us in honolulu. you are on. go ahead. >> can you hear me? >> yes, thanks. >> it is hawaii standard time. i have a direct relative to my grandmother, of course. her name is jesse hayes. she was born in 1870. in the lower midwest. probably, by blood, long removed. i looked at this beautiful lucy sitting in the chair, looking at the camera with those big eyes, and her beautiful childre
's the deal for those of you that don't know, 14-year-old black kid in mississippi, 1955, flirted with a white woman. a few days later, two white racists attacked him, shot him to death. this is who she is comparing trayvon martin. i feel like oprah diminished her brand. it was a missed opportunity. i was expecting her to take the high road and elevate the conversation and bring the country forward and add a little unity here. but instead she made this atrocious analogy and i am a little disappointed in her. >> i will say that was an awesome chandelier. >>> banned phrase. decimate. we discussed it in a block. i must have got 150 tweets telling me exactly what decimate means and that the president was using it incorrectly. i disagree, he was using it correctly. to decimate is to kill every tenth man. 90% of al qaeda is in operation because president obama says we have 10%, 90% left. >> that's technically what he meant. >> using decimate. >> if we stop using the words you tell us not to use, we can't talk any more. >> i want to ban every single word. >> get out. throw to "special report." >> tha
is violence. >> keenan leaks of jackson, mississippi, once thought it was impossible for black students to be falling so short in education. >> ask the kids in my neighbor hood and the parents and coming to find out there was a 70% dropout rate in the neighborhood. parents want a choice. even poor parents want a choice. why should only rich children have a choice? >> the work is being applauded not only by parents, students and businesses but also politicians and gospel recording artist marvin sapp. >> when we see how we are using our young children at an alarming rate, i believe that somebody needs to step to the plate. you know what, i take that challenge of trying to bring about change. >> i'm a doctor, phd, coming out of a housing project in milwaukee, wisconsin. the only thing that got me to the point you and i are having this interview is an education. >> power of an education for dr. howard fuller is the power of faith. he acknowledges there is still a lot of work that needs to be done. >> getting message out. one of the best ways i have ever heard. thank you. >>> president obama
mother black. they had to leave mississippi in the '60s to get married. >> how did it affect you, the idea that your parents' marriage was a crime? >> well, i think that it created in me a sense of psychological exile. >> and when she was 19, her mother was murdered by her former stepfather. >> that's the moment where i really tried in the language of poetry to make sense of that loss. >> here the dead stand up in stone. white marble on confederate avenue. i stand on ground once hallowed by a web of -- >> one of the themes of her work is memory. what gets left out of the nation's public record. she won a pulitzer prize in 2007 for native guard. about a forgotten black union regiment that fought in the civil war. >> we know it is our duty now to keep white men as prisoners. rebel soldiers. would-be masters. >> she wrote that poem in the library's reading room in seat 170. sometimes to rest her eyes, she would look up at a pillar marked poetry. >> now when i do it, i can't see the word poetry so clearly. but i have faith that it's there. >> so she will continue to cheer lead. for a
? where is this trend going? >> we found there's a wide variation in welfare benefits inch mississippi, only 16-$17,000 a year in welfare benefits in a state like hawai'i it was almost $50,000. so that is a pretty good wage if you want to take it that way. >> neil: you know, worries me there's going to be a lot of people listening and watching saying, all the more reason that you double the minimum wage, all the more reason you bring it up to $15 an hour. i would flip it around and say all the more reason you scale back the benefits so they're so general didn't -- generous. >> raiding wages you just increase unemployment. you can't force companies to pay people more than the productivity that's provide. as soon as you start doing that, the companies basically just reduce the amount of labor they have going in. they reduce wages. you're already seeing that, of course, if obamacare. >> neil: welfare was supposed to be temporary in the beginning, supposed to be at a level that wouldn't even have you consider such a move. but between welfare and these other programs that augment and ad --
stone mountain of georgia, let freedom ring. from every mole hill -- >> from mississippi, from every mountainside -- >> let freedom ring. and i think people all across america in their hearts believe that freedom should ring for everybody. >> free at last, free at last, thank god, almighty, we are free at last. >> incredible. byron is here with us now. george, this was really one of the defining moments of the 20th century. >> it was. martin luther king said rightly, he appropriated american rhetoric, saying, i'm not trying to change america, i'm trying to reconnect with the american past. and in that sense, he did a wonderful job. >> well, you know, the whole idea of forming a more perfect union. over the centuries, we have tried to perfect this union. this was a moment of really trying to perfect it. mightily. but there was tremendous fear. i remember it very well. my father was majority whip of the congress at the time, a deep southerner, very close with president kennedy. and the fear of violence that was -- that was palpable, and the fear that it would ruin the cause of civil ri
. but i wonder if an iconic white figure from south carolina or mississippi or alabama -- >> bill: but she comes out -- less than a month ago, right. she comes out and uses the "n" word and planning this birthday party for her brother and she's going to have -- this will be cute. we'll have it like a plantation birthday party and all of the waiters will be black waiters all dressed up and yes, sir, this and yes, sir, that. and is dropped by all of her sponsors. does she have anybody left? the book deal. she had a three-book deal. that was canceled. sponsors dropped her. she's in all of this trouble. yet she comes out, 73% positive compared to 59% among -- again, on republicans, in georgia. >> what i want to know is what's not to like about martin luther king? what's unfavorable about martin luther king? i can think of one thing that republicans in georgia find unfavorable. >> bill: i can, too. i guess maybe he doesn't make a mean enough peach pie. 1-866-55-press. let's talk about it here on the "full court press." >> announcer: get social with bill press. like us at facebook.com/billpresss
on the mississippi, which was not quite as good as what mark twain portrayed in his book, but after doing that for a year, he teamed up with another american of german dissent named ben mast, and together they went to work in a flour mill in st. louis, and they did that for about a year; then they moved to illinois where they worked on a farm for three years, and in 185 p -- 1853 after hearing the great stories about the gold rush in california, they decided to make the move west, and they did this by buying 200 head of livestock driving them from st. louis to california, and turns out that could be a profitable venture things even back then were more expensive in california than they were in st. louis. you could buy a cow or ox for five or ten dollars in st. louis, and the same animal cost $50 or more in california. it was a profitable trip for them. they arrived in dayton, nevada in 1853, and they immediately went to work panning for gold in the carson river the next day. they did this for about three years working gold, operating a sleuth box for mixed results. some days very profitabl
with teeders ---door key leader us of our allies. make no mistake, president obama believes there mississippi be accountability for those who would use the world's most heinous weapons against the world's most vulnerable people. nothing today is more serious and nothing is receiving more serious scrutiny. thank you. >> i'm trace gallagher in for shepard smith. just heard secretary of said john kerry giving his first accounts of the crisis in syria. the secretary delivers litany of what they believe is the proof
is white. other mother black. they had to leave mississippi in the 1960s to get married. how do you think it affected you the idea that your parent's marriage was a crime? >> well, i think that it created in me a sense of psychological exile. >> and when she was 19, her mother was murdered by her former stepfather. >> i tried to make sense of that loss. >> here the dead stand up in stone. i stand on ground once hollowed by -- >> she won a pulitzer prize in 2007. about a forgotten union regiment that fought in the civil war. >> we know that it is our duty now to keep white men as would be masters. >> she wrote that poem and would look up at a pillar marked poetry. >> and now that i do it i can't see it so clearly but i have faith that it is there. >> so she will continue to cheer lead in a world that doesn't always value that. >> trying to find a way to say what seems so necessary to be said but so difficult also to someone that i can speak intimately to. across time and space on the page that is thrilling to me. >> this summer the library of congress appointed her to a second term. but he
by the church in philadelphia, mississippi, a worker from boston was beaten to death. the day of this demonstration we have six people shot in washington the same day. black americans right now, young people, we lose 3000 every six months. we have a 9/11 every six months. over 4000 died in 40 years of lynching. we could lose more than that in one year. the priorities that we have are not racism. just because i say that i need tires for my car, my mother gots heart surgery, we have to establish priorities. because i spend my resources helping my mother does not mean i do not need tires. the challenge we face is we are going to give voice to the least of all its children as a measure of our effectiveness and leadership? [applause] the answers will come by going sufferingommunities of problem, and finding out not from the 70% of the households that are raising children, dropping out, but what is happening in the 30% of the households of the people who are not dropping out of school, in jail, on drugs. we just rolled a young lady in going toin teske, college, and for years she has
thomas, the mother of three from mississippi at the new orleans saints training camp as a referee. >> and she is a member of the league's referee training program in line for an official full-time job. "gma" anchor josh elliott has her story. >> here we go. >> reporter: in the bold black and white stripes and hair tucked under that plaque hat, the official looks exactly like every other one on the field. >> watch your step here, 17. little tight. little tight. >> reporter: 39-year-old sarah thomas, married mother of three is on the verge of history. >> are you a tomboy? >> i am a tomboy, yes. but i am married with two boys. >> reporter: poised to become the first ever full time female official for the national football league. >> where's mama? >> 72, you've got to move up on those pass plays. put your guard up. put your guard up. individually, i am a female. a lot of things set us apart. race, gender, different background. but collectively, we're out there for the same goal. >> reporter: for 15 years, on fir -- officiating grade school, high school, and college games. discovered b
, mississippi. >> caller: yes, sir. >> bill: how are you doing? what do you say? >> caller: i'm doing fine. thanks for taking my call, bill. on the smoker's issue, you know, i'm totally against people that are against people smoking. i smoked for 15 years, 1979, i quit for 30 years. and i just picked them back up about three years ago. and i never had an issue with people that smoked whenever i quit smoking. all of my friends smoked. most of them -- i'm just not against -- if people want to smoke, let them smoke. >> bill: i'm with you. here's the deal, why did you pick it up again? you know it's not good for you. >> there are a lot of things aren't good for me. i'm going to die of something some time. it is a freedom of ourselves to do what we want. >> bill: peter, you made that point earlier. living in this country, we are able to make some dumb decisions. >> i respect his decision to do something very dumb and i always hate to hear someone say well, you're going to die of something. yeah, you're going to die of something but if you decide you're going to decide to just all of a sudden st
the mississippi river. flash flooding for some of the heavier downpours we're seeing right now. it's a lot about temperatures too, 73 for a high in chicago where the normal high is 83 degrees. we're well into the 100s in parts of texas that will stay the case tomorrow and it'll stay pretty chilly in chicago, 74 degrees with some late day thunderstorms but in the northeast we are starting off a stretch of low humidity, temperatures right around 80 degrees so some areas lucking out with the weather. >> okay, for which we thank you very much, dylan dreyer. >> no one landed the prize in the powerball drawing. it's going to a whopping $400 million. and in today's number ones, the states that spend top dollar on lottery tickets. massachusetts leads the way according to a study last year, average spending, 860 bucks a year per person. georgia second with spending $470. $20 less than third place new york and also beer, let's talk about that coming out on top in a new gallup survey as america's favorite alcoholic beverage. 36% prefer beer. 35% prefer wine and 23% go for hard liquor. >> i told you i didn'
, your thoughts on the president's remarks yesterday. west mississippi, independent line. caller: i completely agree with the president. mr. snowden is not a patriot. one of the most important thing is facing our country now is this whole issue of fiber security. fibrous security is more important to our nation than the budget deficit problem. it is more important than our dependence on foreign oil. we have to be more aggressive with our cyber security protection. when have to be more aggressive with regard to battling against these groups who want to break into our cyber systems that control everything from our financial markets to our power grids and everything else. houston,ther troy from texas. republican line. caller: thank you for taking my call. i think he is a patriot. the government cannot listen to every phone call and every conversation we have. that information is our private property. we should be able to sell it as we see fit. cyber security is no excuse for setting up being cut or a police state. this is a country and it seems like he is a patriot to me. host: suzanne
opportunity. let me conclude with this. generations, if this is 20th-century mississippi -- or 20th-century mali, young people have risked their safety and given their lives to give the -- get the education that has opened their potential. she spoke to and for the world's children. her message was clear. we want school and education for will child, and we continue the journey to our destination of these and education. nobody can stop us. we will speak up for our rights and bring change to our voice. all of you are helping to answer that call. i thank you for your service and your commitment, your creativity and courage. let's work together in individual nations and around the world until there are no more >> to fall through, no more barriers to run into and no more threats to their safety as they pursue their education and their dreams. if you want peace, work for justice, it has been said. we know this cuts to the root of if we wantallenge -- justice and peace, we must work for education. thank you so much, and i am happy to take your questions. [applause] >> is that working? mayb
office. the other is mississippi, which doesn't surprise you so much, but iowa? >> bill: that stuns me. there are so many great progressives there. >> and fabulous women leaders. i think 2016 is the year. >> bill: you mentioned senator claire mccal mccaskill. here she is from your forum. >> really hard choice as democrats last tight between two amazing candidates, and it was difficult. i'm optimistic that she'll be the candidate and we will be able to say madam presiden president 2016. >> bill: no doubt where she is. >> oh, no, not at all. >> bill: and she said she was with barack obama last time. and i think she felt guilty about it ever since. >> as she said, it was a tough choice last time. it's not a tough choice this time. one of the things that i'm excited to see inside the town hall, keep in mind this is august 2013. we're talking about a run three years from now. it was a packed room. there was overflow, spillover. and one of the things that was awesome to see was the iowa obama '08 people and the iowa '08 people all talking together and excited to be there and part of the same
, they have become more eligible. host: the next call is from mississippi. appreciate mrly his comments. however, education starts and home. we have to focus on poor choices. we have all made them. we cannot continue this charade of talking around the mountain. you go through the mountain. you only go through with the word to the wise. focus on the fundamentals. we have to educate children at a young age and raise them properly. then we do not have children having children. we have to stop this in schools. this is not teaching 10 year-old kids in school to pick up the morning after pill. this is not rocket science. it is life or death. i do not worship death. i know the good doctor does not either. besharov.las guest: the challenge with the social programs is to help those in need without generating greater need. that affects every program we have. infects foreign aid. it is a challenge. i wish we could understand a balance has to be drawn. we do not seem to be doing that. host: the programs were heavy on because- dairy republican dairy farmers wanted government regulation to force sell
audience he was a kid from chicago who had gone to mississippi to visit his family. he was in a store. he made a comment about white woman. that lead to him being picked up by a punch of color racists and murdered. that was the reference they made. >> brutally murdered. >> brutally murdered to say the least. >> shot in the head and thrown into a river. >> all about making a comment about a white woman that was not that offensive. >> is it fair to relate the trayvon martin case to -- >> i don't think so. till was -- really became a symbol for that era. i don't think that was the right example. >> thoughts? >> i don't know. there will always be a difference of opinion and it will never change. why don't we just move on? i think oprah can have fun with us by constantly saying things every day and seeing if we will cover. it i don't want mayo on my tuna fish sandwich. and then on "the five" the next day we will go, tuna fish? really, oprah? tuna fish? what is wrong with you? what is happening to you? could this hurt your brand? >> i like mayo. >> i hate tuna fish, but i love mayo. >> that's w
to parts of the gulf coast this weekend. gulf port mississippi is swamped. and flooding caused schools to be canceled today in three florida counties. more rain is in the forecast. >> >>> good morning. got a few clouds around the bay area this morning. so far it is quiet. this afternoon could get interesting. possibility of isolated thunderstorms around the bay area. looking back towards san francisco a little hazy and dense fog. low pressure spinning off the coastline. it is going to sit there the next few days and keep things unsettled through wednesday. red flag warnings up in the mountain tops. up into the 90s. >>> that national report sponsored by the new thriller in theaters august 28th. >>> new questions this morning about the death of princess diana. >> reporter: good morning, charlie, gayle. there have been conspiracy theories about the death of princess diana and dodi fayed in that paris car crash since it happened. police here in scotland yard are admitting they are actually looking into the latest allegation that the death was caused by, wait for it a member of
.s. in the military yesterday. mississippi, democratic caller. your message to congress? take healtheed to care way from congress. they are making $70 per hour and they will not even raise the minimum wage. most of america are too stupid to realize they're voting against their own interests by not voting health care for themselves. have a nice day. host: sue, your message to congress? caller: i want to be at your health care plan, congress. host: what do you think should be done about the health care law? host: if they vote it in for us, they should be under the same health care. host: do you think should be defunded? caller: yes, i do. host: have you send that message to a member of congress? caller: i have not. host of the to attend a town hall meeting? caller: yes, i have. --t: who is did you go to whose did you go to? caller: ron paul. host: when was that? m, when he was running last time? host: thank you. next caller. caller tell my message to them is -- caller: my message to them is that obama care is coming in with -- medicare was here before obama care. if we take money at of this out of th
in remote, western kentucky. it's right near the mississippi river in that little part of kentucky that abuts missouri and it's in a town of like 400 people and the candidates come and just the audience heckles them and things get thrown on the stage. i found a story from 1995 and two candidates from secretary of state in kk centucky. his father chants fbi, fbi during a speech. almost a fight, they had to hold him back. that's what's going on in coycoid tco kentucky today. i wonder, rick, we talk about mitch mcconnell last segment. what are kentucky voters going to be see from mitch mcconnell over the next year? >> people underestimate him because he has a soft kind of effect and this guy is not going to play a round and he's not going to take any -- there's not going to be any slack for either allison grimes or his republican opponent. this is a guy who goes for the throat and he's not going to screw around and i think you're going to see he has three things going for him. he has resources and he'll spend them, he'll spend them early, that works. an early understanding of the stat
center. is a member of the mississippi bar. he was an executive vice president of energy and the youngest chairman of the federal energy regulatory commission to date. so with that said i would like to invite kurds and the entire panel to come up. -- kurt and the entire panel to come up. [inaudible conversations] good morning. great to be. i really want to thank the bipartisan policy center for putting this together. as you know, this is the cutting edge issue right now, and when it comes to risk and how we deal with going forward, mitigation of those risks has everything to do with our success. and yes, the industry is doing a lot. the industry has already done much to make certain that is too. one of the things i really find a little humorous, norman the industry goes last on these panels. your first here, and i think complexity, how is it -- how isn't listed here? what did i do with -- anyway, it has something to do with responding them and you get to respond first. so i think that's a great opportunity for you too sure exactly what's going on in industry, what yo you know, howu know i
: our guest has written a topic -- book on topic. the first call is bill from mississippi. republican line. go ahead, you are on with kevin of the boston globe. >> caller: good morning. my question is multifaceted. when they prosecuted al al capone he got eleven years. if they charged him with tax evasion. he's already 83. it would have given him -- he would have died in jail. it if the prosecutors opened the door to everything. absolutely everything. whitey because he wanted to defend his legacy as far as killing women and on and so forth. choose not to testify. it was going to be his last hooray. yet he choose not to do it. i don't understand why he didn't testify. >> guest: i think i do. i think he was afraid of being cross examined by the prosecutors. once he testifies he opens himself to everything. i'm the prosecutors i go to his teen days and ask about the sexual assault he was a charged with. he was not convicted. they could ask him about it. he portrays himself as a great patriot. he did three years in the air force. i would ask him to explain why he was charged with rape whe
the storm troopers of the movement. they went into the mississippi delta, where other organizations were afraid to go. and out of the mississippi delta, a sharecropping family. by her own account, went to school only one date in her entire life. i would argue she was one of the most eloquent spokespersons for the aims of the movement. the speech that she gave the democratic national convention in 1964, you can youtube it. if you have not heard it, hear it. it is one of the most eloquent statements i've heard. a courageous woman. but again, if we move from the national level to the local level, the list grows and grows. one of the most exciting things about being involved in the scholarly production of the civil rights movement, we have a lot of really good stuff that is coming up that is talking about these local activists who are anonymous for the most part with a national movement. and if we go back to where we are today clearly, we are at a place where we have to think of very local terms the action is going to be at the state level. living in kansas, i would argue kansas is a laborat
processing plant in mississippi a couple of miles from the state penitentiary, they have a program that allows prisoners to leave and make $6 per hour processing chickens. they said they have never had a prisoner last more than two days cleaning chickens. that they would rather be in their cells in prison than work in the chicken processing plant because it is such hard, dirty, nasty work. we are seeing the same thing in arizona. picking lettuce, there are no american workers lining up to do those jobs. host: a couple more tweets -- guest: if there were? oh, well, a dirtly littlesecret about immigration, if you wanted to come to the united states and clean a hotel room or work in a service sector that is not agriculture, there is no way for you to come to this country to work. there is especially no way for you to stay. we do not have a visa category that addresses these people. while we do have an agriculture program, it is small and difficult to use and many employers do not use it. in california they say that 70% of agriculture workers are here illegally and only 4% of the total
this huge crowd from mississippi. >> how has your time in new york been? >> wonderful. is coming here the highlight? >> absolutely. >> we are talking about his fire with areas of the west. >> overnight it went from a 60,000 acre fire to a 120,000 acre fire. 150 miles from san francisco you might think they get a big part of their water. 80% of their water comes from the hetch hetchy reservoir. there is rainfall going into the southwest. it won't come on shore with the tropical storm. southern california could be getting heavy rain falling in quick amounts of time. all of the areas that you see have flood watches and warnings going on. a couple of inches of rain have fallen and there is flooding going on. we'll send it back to you inside. >> well, remember the benghazi attacks were at a year september 11th, 2012 and we still don't have a lot of answers and folks behind bars. suspects have been identified in this attack. we are learning new information and sources told fox news that the special operations group that we put in charge of getting these guys are getting out. here is what a
. in georgia and mississippi. we are fighting the sheriff's i elected officials, the people that in a way they believe think were fighting america. then the largest crowd ever assembled in this country to that time came together. we are america. this coming started we have to come together again because, well, substitute the tea party, the brothers, goldman sachs, corporations for the sheriffs and the policemen in the south. look what they're doing to america today. that's why we have to get together again. voting rights is under attack. we have the "stand your ground." whose ground? the regreggives, i like that word and the racists want us to believe it's their ground. but it's not. it's everybody's ground. what they want is to legalize the right to shoot somebody and kill somebody because their skin color might be, to them, suspicious. [inaudible] we used to call that lynching. the "stand your ground" laws are new pro-lynch laws. why is all of this happening? i believe it's happening because the corporations, the people that are running the businesses today want to treat workers however
in the south like louisiana, mississippi. you know, what's happening in some of those states in terms of -- is that helping or hurting? >> that's a really important point. this is kind of one of the interesting demographic changes in america over the last 25 years. richard vedder is the expert on this who you'll hear from later. traditionally, immigrants have shunned the south other than texas. in fact, that's been a problem for growth in the south for a hundred, since the end of the civil war. now you're seeing dixie attracting the immigrant states like north carolina. one of the states that has had the biggest percentage increase in immigration over last 15 years has been georgia. and georgia actually has become a high growth state. and this gets to the point people ask are immigrants more attracted to a state that has high welfare went fits -- benefits or to a state that has jobs. and so we rooked at some of -- we looked at some of this evidence, and what we found was on balance immigrants are much more likely to go to states with low unemployment rates than they are to go to the s
can do how can we serve and then power them. in 1963 in jackson, mississippi, angry protesters and armed police prevented any massacre after the murder of edgar evans. that was a kind of lawyer and later that he was. years later he gave me his photo with a description from tennyson's eula says. .. and particularly the american bar association. thank you all very much. [applause] hillary clinton wrapping up her remarkings in san francisco. we are going to take you live with the national prez club and a discussion underway a minute ago on the role of government affairs officers and whether they help or hinder government transparency. live coverage on c-span2. >> the panelist presentations will be available on paoand reporters pao in public affairs officers and a and d reporters at blog spot. com. as a reporter i should disclose that i'm biased in favor of as much openness and disclosure as possible and as few rules as possible about who can talk to reporters in the federal government, and how. but i also recognize and i really mean this. the public affairs has an indispensable j
california or new york but louisiana, mississippi. >> that is the important point the interesting immigration graphic you would hear from the experts later but traditionally immigrants have shunned the south of man has been a problem that now use the dixie's like north carolina wednesday with the biggest percentage increase is georgia. that has become the high-growth state to the point where people ask our immigrants more attracted to a state with high welfare benefits or to the state that has jobs? what we have found is on balance democrats are more likely to go to low unemployment rates than with high welfare benefits which is the important timing because people are coming here because they want a job the. >> and it does make sense if you leave your country. >> it does make sense but there is so many people on the other side of this issue that the immigrants come here for welfare. some do but the vast majority do not. >> a very important point. >> so now with the international experts the author of a chapter of the bush institutes solutions looking at growth and immigration and evidence she
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